Feature Demo: Emerging Technology Articles Collection

deus_ex_wallpaper_by_anubins-d5swuvn

Like I mentioned in my introduction, I spend a good portion of my time sorting through science news and emerging technology articles. I’m working on generating a way for you to easily sort through my recent readings on the topics, as well as attaching a synopsis of my views so you can easily catch up with what different technologies mean, how they work, and where they might go.

 

In the mean time, however, I’ve put together a quick demo showing you everything that passes into my favorites read list, sorted out from all the articles I see every day. There’s no explicit tagging on this yet, but hopefully there will be in the future. Feel free to peruse and enjoy! Feedback is welcomed on number of articles per page I should display. I’m also going to try to hack in some CSS to format things so they’re a bit easier to read.

 

«    22 of 22    »

Video: Future armored ground vehicles could sprint, dodge and shield their way out of danger

One of the key goals of DARPA's Ground X-Vehicle Technology (GXV-T) program is improving the survivability of ground-based armored fighting vehicles by increasing vehicle agility.
Learn more

High-performance computing crossing the barriers between clouds achieved

The Information Technology Research Institute of the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology has developed a technology with which once an environment to perform high-performance computing has been established, a virtual cluster-type computer can easily be built on a differe
Learn more

Researchers part water: 'Electric prism' separates water's nuclear spin states

Using an "electric prism", scientists have found a new way of separating water molecules that differ only in their nuclear spin states and, under normal conditions, do not part ways.
Learn more

A low-energy optical circuit for a new era of technology

Optical circuits use light instead of electricity, making them faster and more energy-efficient than electrical systems. Scientists at Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne have developed a first building-block for photonic 'transistors' that requires record-low energy to operate.
Learn more

First-ever look inside a working lithium-ion battery (w/ Video)

For the first time, researchers have been able to open a kind of window into the inner workings of a lithium-ion battery.
Learn more

World's first software to automate production-line image recognition

Fujitsu Laboratories has announced the development of a technology for automatically generating image-recognition programs that accurately detect the positions of components as captured by cameras in automated assembly processes by utilizing images of electronic components and IT equipment.
Learn more

Researchers advance artificial intelligence for player goal prediction in gaming

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed artificial intelligence (AI) software that is significantly better than any previous technology at predicting what goal a player is trying to achieve in a video game.
Learn more

«    22 of 22    »

Technology Tracking Methods Part 1: The Problem

This is less an informative lecture than some thoughts on a problem that I run into.

Technology foraging, technology tracking, whatever you want to call it–is hard.

To keep abreast of all the technologies that I feel are necessary, I have to read approximately 50 RSS feeds a day, and sort through the content by hand. I had previously attempted to put together a system that automatically sorted articles by subject and importance, but it didn’t work out so well (this is part of the driving purpose behind a project I’d like to unveil to the public sometime shortly). This means that I have to go through about ~300 articles a day and manually tag/sort them, as well as decide how important they are.

Furthermore, I’m only gleaming the tips of the iceberg–there’s thousands of industry specific scientific articles that I’m missing, not to mention the wealth of information hidden in areas like patents and scientific journals. There’s an incredibly amount of data, and I’m missing huge amounts of it. To adequately track technology, I need to be able to render down all that data into something human readable or searchable.

Is it so surprising, then, that most people (even ones that see the development of technology as critical to their profession) can’t keep up with technology? I have to specifically set aside time to do it and it can get wearying even for me. It doesn’t scale, either. There’s no real way to add more to my tracking abilities as they stand right now without a linear increase in time spent. This means that further tools are needed.

These tools are being worked on right now, and I hope to implement the first step soon, which I’ll discuss briefly in the next blog post. I hope to share parts of my process as I develop them so that others are either inspired to take up the tools I provide, or build their own. The problem is currently poorly served.